More great advice from Dr Jim Harris: A common mistake for believers in business is to lead more from their natural leadership than from their supernatural leadership. Yet taking the leap from natural into supernatural leadership is much easier than you may think. Moreover, if you are only operating in the natural, you are ignoring the Holy Spirit (third person of the Trinity) who now lives within your Spirit. “The Spirit of man is the lamp  of Lord, Searching all the inner depths of his heart.” Proverbs 20:27

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Here are the key differences with three compelling reasons to take the leap into supernatural leadership.

Too Much Natural Leadership?

natural adj: formulated by human reason alone rather than revelation; occurring in conformity with the ordinary course of nature; not marvelous or supernatural; operating in the physical world as opposed to the spiritual world.

supernatural adj: unable to be explained by explained by laws of nature; of or relating to an order or existence beyond the visible, observable universe & especially of or relating to God.

It is so easy—even tempting—to lead from the natural man. We live in a natural body, work in a natural work surrounded by millions of others who only attempt to leverage and grow their natural skills. So we fall prey to succumbing to the trap of natural leadership—just like so many others.

You may be leaning too much on your natural leadership if you currently struggle with:

  • What to do next
  • How to get there—wherever “there” is
  • Slugging through the status quo of doing the same things over and over
  • Desiring different, better results but never seeming to break through
  • Which leadership guru/expert to follow
  • Solving the same problems over and over
  • Motivating yourself or your team
  • Fear of losing your business, home or lifestyle

If any of these describes you, I suggest it is time for you take the leap into supernatural leadership.

Here are three big reasons to take the leap:

1. From education to revelation. “But as it is written: ‘Eye has not seen, nor ear heard, Nor have entered into the heart of man the things which God has prepared for those who love Him.’ But God has revealed them to us through His Spirit. For the Spirit searches all things, yes, the deep things of God” (1 Cor. 2:9-10).

Natural leadership focuses on the wisdom of man. From secular business books, magazines and endless conferences and blogs, it is easy to over-educate our natural heads with worldly “wisdom.”

Supernatural leadership focuses not upon any person’s persuasive words and spiritual-sounding insights, but on the infallible, perfect wisdom of God.

2. From misled to Spirit-led. “For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, these are the sons of God” (Rom. 8:14).

As I detail in my book Our Unfair Advantage (OUA), believers in business can be easily misled. From being head-led, expert-led, opportunity-led, money-led and more, natural leaders (like I was for decades) are easily misled by the latest and greatest stuff.

Supernatural leaders purpose in their hearts to only and always be led by the Holy Spirit, who will never mislead you. He will always guide you into all truth and help you position yourself and your business for—yes—supernatural growth and impact.

3. Human-powered to God-powered. “I can do nothing of Myself” (John 5:30a).

“Then Jesus said to them, ‘When you lift up the Son of Man, then you will know that I am He, and I do nothing of Myself. But I speak these things as My Father taught Me.'” (John 8:28).

“My speech and my preaching was not with enticing words of man’s wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power, so that your faith should not stand in the wisdom of men, but in the power of God” (1 Cor. 2:4-5).

Even Jesus could not operate as a natural leader. Think about that for a minute. Jesus gave up his heavenly throne and power (Phil. 2:5-8) to operate as a man of flesh, supernaturally led and employed by the Holy Spirit.

Jesus walked as a human who gave God permission to supercharge His natural gifts and to release more supernatural leadership gifts. So can you. Imagine the potential impact!

Get Ready to Take the Leap

Let’s revisit the natural leadership list from above. If you were to take the leap into supernatural leadership, would God through His Spirit tell you how to:

  • Know what to do next?
  • Get “there” and exactly where “there” is?
  • Break through your status quo?
  • Achieve different, better results?
  • Follow the one perfect leadership guru/expert (Jesus)?
  • Solve every problem once and for all?
  • Motivate yourself & your team?
  • Overcome your fear of losing your business, home or lifestyle?

Of course He would—and so much more.

As we take this journey together, my focus will be to guide and equip you on how to take the leap into a God-directed, Jesus-gifted, Holy Spirit-empowered supernatural future for yourself and your business.

Who’s ready to take the leap?

Dr. Jim Harris is President of The Jim Harris Group, an international speaking and advising firm dedicated to helping believers in business unleash their unfair advantage in the marketplace. He is the author of Our Unfair Advantage: Unleash the Power of the Holy Spirit in Your Business and numerous other award-winning business books.


You don’t know it all. There are limits to your knowledge, ability and energy. And while the competitive nature of our culture, which often sneaks into our lives for those in leadership, and would have us to hide all of our weaknesses in fear, there is tremendous power in becoming vulnerable with people.


This article was written for church leaders but it just as applicable to business leaders and leaders in general. Deciding to become vulnerable is risky. As church leaders (business leaders), there will be people in our congregations (businesses) that don’t want us to be human. They would prefer that we wear a halo and pretend we’re never tempted to sin in the same ways they are. They feel safer if we, as spiritual leaders, are immune to the crass realities of life.

But when we hide our weaknesses, three big problems arise:

1. Our weaknesses get worse, feeding off the shame and secrecy.

2. We become dishonest and hypocritical.

3. The truth inevitably comes out, and people are disillusioned as a result.

So is bearing our vulnerability worth the risk? Absolutely. Here are some important reasons vulnerability is a forgotten virtue of great leadership:

1. It’s emotionally healthy. Maintaining an image of perfection requires enormous amounts of emotional energy. One of the reasons we sometimes get so stressed-out and depressed is because we’re working so hard to stay behind the facade and keep everyone convinced that we’re strong.

If you are worried about your image, you are heading for burnout. Keeping people happy and impressing others is terribly exhausting, and it’s always temporary. Eventually, people get to know our weaknesses all at once.

Being real and vulnerable, on the other hand, is liberating. It’s freeing. In fact, it’s really the only way to live. James 5:16 says, Confess your faults to one another and pray for one another, that you may be healed. The effective, fervent prayer of a righteous man accomplishes much. We need to confess our sins to God to be forgiven, but we also need to talk about our weaknesses with others to find healing.

In fact, some faults won’t budge until you confess them to others.

2. It’s spiritually empowering. James also says, “God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble” (James 4:6b). It is impossible to lead in ministry without the grace of God. And how do you find the grace you need? You find it by humbling yourself before God and others.

Remember, pride prevents power.

3. It’s relationally attractive. Everybody is wearing a mask, and it’s what we expect others to do as well. When we choose to throw our masks away, we surprise people with our authenticity. Being real is the fastest way to endear yourself to others.

We tend to love people who area real, honest, humble and vulnerable, and we tend to despise people who are deceitful, arrogant and hypocritical. Paul told the Thessalonian believers, So having great love toward you, we were willing to impart to you not only the gospel of God but also our own lives, because you were dear to us” (1 Thess. 2:8).

When you share your strengths, you create competition. But when you share your weaknesses, you create community. You let people know “We’re all in this together.”

Pastors are often incredibly lonely people. Why? I believe it’s in large part because they’re so afraid of the cost of being vulnerable.

4. It’s a mark of leadership. We only follow leaders we trust. The first requirement for effective leadership is credibility, and the more honest you are, the more credible you become.

Real leaders lead by example. They go first. If your desire is that the church, group or organisation you’re leading be a place where people are open, you must be the first to open up.

You must decide whether you want to impress people (which you can do from a distance) or influence people (which you can only do up close).

5. It increases the impact of your preaching/leading. The concept of preaching from our vulnerability is something I’ve written about before because it’s a really big idea. In the previous generation of great preachers, we usually asked what’s the most powerful way to preach this? Now, we should be asking what’s the most personal way to preach this?

You will always be more effective as a personal witness and a storyteller than as a skilled orator. As you preach and lead, try to answer these questions:

  • What struggles and weaknesses should I share with others?
  • What progress am I making that others could learn from?
  • What am I currently learning, especially from my failures?

Rick Warren is the founding pastor of Saddleback Church. His book, The Purpose Driven Church, was named one of the 100 Christian books that changed the 20th century. He is also founder of, a global Internet community for pastors.

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