Category Archives: Business Strategy

Jesus is CEO of Top-Branded Honey Company.

Nature Nate’s is the top-branded honey in America, but the company’s president, Nathan Sheets, refuses to take credit. Instead, the marketer-turned-beekeeper attributes his business’ rapid success and growth to Jesus.

“The overwhelming theme that engulfed me as I started really focusing on Nature Nate’s was ‘God is our CEO, and I’m simply the chief steward of what He’s entrusted to us,'” says Sheets of his McKinney, Texas-based company.

Sheets pursues this theme not only by cultivating a healthy work environment for his employees but also by using the company’s finances and influence to share the love of Christ and strengthen families and communities.

For instance, Nature Nate’s has launched the Honey Gives Hope corporate giving program and was the presenting sponsor of the 2017 GMA Dove Awards honoring the best in Christian music. The company partnered with the Dove Awards to promote Show Hope, an organization seeking to unite orphans and loving families as quickly and easily as possible.

Sheets believes exercising this kind of stewardship has a positive impact on the company overall.

“The success of Nature Nate’s isn’t because we’re great branders or we’re great marketers,” Sheets says. “I believe the success of Nature Nate’s is because we truly want to use this platform to make a difference for eternity.”

Falling in Love With Bees

“We went from this teeny-tiny honey company in 2012 to five years later, we’re the No. 1-branded honey in America [according to market research firm IRI],” Sheets says. “It’s just a total God story.”


Sheets realised that the regional focus of the North Dallas brand would keep the company from growing in popularity across the U.S. After much prayer, he decided to make two changes: personalise the brand name and shift the focus from the honey’s local quality to its raw, unfiltered characteristics.

Sheets’ wife came up with a significant idea: using his college nickname, “Nature Boy.” Together, they settled on renaming the company “Nature Nate’s.”

“We rebranded and did the labels so that 80 percent of the label focus is on raw and unfiltered,” he says. “And man, we were just blessed to be at the right place at the right time in the right industry.”

Selling to Advance the Kingdom

Indeed, 80 percent of the label’s focus is on the honey’s “raw, unfiltered” quality, but 100 percent of the company’s focus is on making an impact for Christ.

“I just came to realise that as a honey company, we don’t have to raise money,” he says. “We can make money, take that money, go do projects and make a difference in people’s lives.”

For Sheets, the company’s impact begins and ends with stewardship.

“I want to steward our people resources, the people who work for us, first and foremost, to make an impact on their lives,” he says. “I want to steward the financial resources and try to make as much as we can, live on as little as we can and give away as much as we can. And then I want to focus on stewardship of our influence and try to use the influence we have at Nature Nate’s to share Christ with people. Then [we can] challenge believers to look at the lens of their business as possibly the biggest opportunity to make a difference for Christ where they are 8 to 5, five days a week.”

Pointing Employees to Jesus

It’s not a requirement to be a Christian to work at Nature Nate’s, but the company’s Christ-focused atmosphere is evident.

Becca May, director of brand management, comes from a non-Christian background, but Sheets has made it easy for her to fit in with company culture.

“I grew up in a Jewish home, and so I was bat-mitzvahed when I was 13,” May says. “I went to a Hebrew school until I was 18. It’s the only faith-background and exposure I’ve ever had. … [Working at Nature Nate’s has] been life-changing and eye-opening—and beyond [our] being welcomed and understood and treated with so much love and respect, Nathan continues to share with us … the lessons and the roots that we find in [his] faith that guide everything we do.”

Several of Sheets’ employees have become believers through personal evangelistic efforts, but his overall focus is on demonstrating and encouraging biblical values. He does this in several ways, such as what he calls “Bee-attitudes”: “Bee passionate,” “Bee creative,” “Bee generous,” “Bee loving,” “Bee faithful” and “Bee honest.” The company rewards employees each month for exhibiting these characteristics. For instance, some employees chose to exercise the “Bee passionate” and “Bee generous” principles by spending their own money to buy needed supplies for victims of Hurricane Harvey in Houston.

Nature Nate’s has also offered practical help to employees in a number of ways, including setting its minimum pay above minimum wage. Sheets’ employees have benefitted from his generosity and also have supported each other in times of need. The company also offers monthly financial management classes to any interested employee.

Innovating for Better Health

The concept of good stewardship pervades not only the work culture of Nature Nate’s but the company’s goals for the future too. Sheets lists his top three, the first of which is to give away $5 million.

“I used to say we want to be there by 2020,” he says, though he wants to take care that his goal doesn’t become a personal idol that consumes his focus.

Another goal on Sheets’ heart is to hire thousands.

“That’s an opportunity to make a difference in the lives of thousands of people,” he says. “On one hand, it really excites me, and on the other hand, it really freaks me out because I know that if you create a machine like that, you’ve got to keep going and growing, and there’s just a lot to that.”

Sheets’ final goal for Nature Nate’s is to create better-for-you products that use honey instead of less-healthy sweeteners such as processed sugar or high-fructose corn syrup.

In January, the company will launch four new nut butters, three jams, a syrup for Kroger and a single-serve snack for Walmart.

“We’re really driven by innovation,” Sheets says. “We don’t just want to be the No. 1-branded honey company in America. We want to be one of the No. 1 better-for-you food companies in America.”

The only way he sees these three goals coming to pass, though, is by depending on and emulating Jesus.

“It says in Ephesians that we’re to smell like the aroma of Christ,” Sheets says. “And as we live our lives and live in authenticity and transparency, people recognize that there’s just something different. It makes people inquire, ‘What’s different?’ And that’s what draws people to the Lord. So we just try to live that out.”

adapted from article by Jenny Rose Curtis, assistant online editor for the media group at Charisma Media 


More great advice from Dr Jim Harris: A common mistake for believers in business is to lead more from their natural leadership than from their supernatural leadership. Yet taking the leap from natural into supernatural leadership is much easier than you may think. Moreover, if you are only operating in the natural, you are ignoring the Holy Spirit (third person of the Trinity) who now lives within your Spirit. “The Spirit of man is the lamp  of Lord, Searching all the inner depths of his heart.” Proverbs 20:27

CPi Terms of sale p2053

Here are the key differences with three compelling reasons to take the leap into supernatural leadership.

Too Much Natural Leadership?

natural adj: formulated by human reason alone rather than revelation; occurring in conformity with the ordinary course of nature; not marvelous or supernatural; operating in the physical world as opposed to the spiritual world.

supernatural adj: unable to be explained by explained by laws of nature; of or relating to an order or existence beyond the visible, observable universe & especially of or relating to God.

It is so easy—even tempting—to lead from the natural man. We live in a natural body, work in a natural work surrounded by millions of others who only attempt to leverage and grow their natural skills. So we fall prey to succumbing to the trap of natural leadership—just like so many others.

You may be leaning too much on your natural leadership if you currently struggle with:

  • What to do next
  • How to get there—wherever “there” is
  • Slugging through the status quo of doing the same things over and over
  • Desiring different, better results but never seeming to break through
  • Which leadership guru/expert to follow
  • Solving the same problems over and over
  • Motivating yourself or your team
  • Fear of losing your business, home or lifestyle

If any of these describes you, I suggest it is time for you take the leap into supernatural leadership.

Here are three big reasons to take the leap:

1. From education to revelation. “But as it is written: ‘Eye has not seen, nor ear heard, Nor have entered into the heart of man the things which God has prepared for those who love Him.’ But God has revealed them to us through His Spirit. For the Spirit searches all things, yes, the deep things of God” (1 Cor. 2:9-10).

Natural leadership focuses on the wisdom of man. From secular business books, magazines and endless conferences and blogs, it is easy to over-educate our natural heads with worldly “wisdom.”

Supernatural leadership focuses not upon any person’s persuasive words and spiritual-sounding insights, but on the infallible, perfect wisdom of God.

2. From misled to Spirit-led. “For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, these are the sons of God” (Rom. 8:14).

As I detail in my book Our Unfair Advantage (OUA), believers in business can be easily misled. From being head-led, expert-led, opportunity-led, money-led and more, natural leaders (like I was for decades) are easily misled by the latest and greatest stuff.

Supernatural leaders purpose in their hearts to only and always be led by the Holy Spirit, who will never mislead you. He will always guide you into all truth and help you position yourself and your business for—yes—supernatural growth and impact.

3. Human-powered to God-powered. “I can do nothing of Myself” (John 5:30a).

“Then Jesus said to them, ‘When you lift up the Son of Man, then you will know that I am He, and I do nothing of Myself. But I speak these things as My Father taught Me.'” (John 8:28).

“My speech and my preaching was not with enticing words of man’s wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power, so that your faith should not stand in the wisdom of men, but in the power of God” (1 Cor. 2:4-5).

Even Jesus could not operate as a natural leader. Think about that for a minute. Jesus gave up his heavenly throne and power (Phil. 2:5-8) to operate as a man of flesh, supernaturally led and employed by the Holy Spirit.

Jesus walked as a human who gave God permission to supercharge His natural gifts and to release more supernatural leadership gifts. So can you. Imagine the potential impact!

Get Ready to Take the Leap

Let’s revisit the natural leadership list from above. If you were to take the leap into supernatural leadership, would God through His Spirit tell you how to:

  • Know what to do next?
  • Get “there” and exactly where “there” is?
  • Break through your status quo?
  • Achieve different, better results?
  • Follow the one perfect leadership guru/expert (Jesus)?
  • Solve every problem once and for all?
  • Motivate yourself & your team?
  • Overcome your fear of losing your business, home or lifestyle?

Of course He would—and so much more.

As we take this journey together, my focus will be to guide and equip you on how to take the leap into a God-directed, Jesus-gifted, Holy Spirit-empowered supernatural future for yourself and your business.

Who’s ready to take the leap?

Dr. Jim Harris is President of The Jim Harris Group, an international speaking and advising firm dedicated to helping believers in business unleash their unfair advantage in the marketplace. He is the author of Our Unfair Advantage: Unleash the Power of the Holy Spirit in Your Business and numerous other award-winning business books.

Is Five-Fold Leadership Relevant for Business Today?

This is a breakthrough insight which ever Christian business person needs to grasp and apply.


“And He Himself gave some to be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, and some pastors and teachers…” Ephesians 4:11

Paul records that Jesus (“…He Himself…”) anoints some believers with supernatural leadership gifts. Indeed, these roles are critical to the functioning of any faith group. But are they relevant outside the four walls of the church? Could they be just as relevant in the marketplace as they are in the pews?

4 Key Words

The four key words in the next verse give us insight into answering this question.

“…for the equipping of the saints for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ.” Ephesians 4:12

Equipping (katartismos) is defined as making fit, preparing, training, perfecting, making fully qualified for service.

Saints (hagios) means those that believe, the morally blameless & consecrated ones.

Work (ergon) means the business, labour, employment, that which anyone is occupied, effort or occupation.

Edifying (oikodome) means the act of building up, to promote growth in Christian wisdom, piety, happiness, and holiness.

This scripture does not say Jesus gave five-fold ministry to only serve the local church, but to equip all the saints for work. And since 98% of His saint’s work in the marketplace, it is reasonable if not mandatory that these saints be equipped and released to operate in their gifts in the marketplace – not just inside the church.

Isn’t the marketplace the primary place for saints to do the work of the ministry?Already Active

Most secular organisations already apply five-fold leadership without realising its Biblical roots and foundation. These companies leverage such leadership gifts as:

  • founders and entrepreneurs, visionaries, pioneers who push into new territories (Apostles)
  • strategists, planner and evaluators, sees opportunities and marketplace needs (Prophets)
  • sales, public relations, marketing, promoters who spread the good news & inspire the team to grow (Evangelists)
  • local managers, team builders, culture-shapers, human resource and work environment managers (Pastors)
  • trainers, teachers, explainers, and coaches who integrate truth into practical actions (Teachers)

My Leadership Gifts Revelation

Recently it dawned on me that over the past 30 years, I was walking in my leadership gift roles — and did not realise it. And much of that time, I was not actively walking with the Lord.

Yes, I was saved and with salvation, Jesus gave me two primary leadership gifts: being able to peak around the corner and see what was coming down the road in talent, leadership, and business culture (Apostle) along with the skill, desire, and ability to study and explain these truths in simple, profound ways (Teacher).

Now I realise (and have been ordained) that I have been gifted by Jesus with a special anointing in two areas where He can supernaturally lift my work far beyond my natural leadership abilities, resulting in far greater marketplace and kingdom impact than before.

Stepping into Your Supernatural Leadership Gifts

As I wrote in my previous blog, supernatural leadership is simply taking the leap into allowing the Holy Spirit and the gifts of Jesus to be fully functioning in your professional/business life.

Over the next five posts, I will introduce you to each of the five-fold leadership gifts. As we explore these leadership roles together, my prayer is that Jesus will reveal to you through the Holy Spirit’s witness (Romans 8:16) your one or two primary leadership gifts. (We’ll save discussion on all the other spiritual gifts for later).

As you discover your unique gift(s), you will then realize the key channels through which Jesus desires to release His leadership power through you (Ephesians 3:20) to manifest Himself in transforming your marketplace for His glory.

Anybody out there ready to discover and unleash your supernatural leadership gifts?

About Dr. Jim Harris

President of The Jim Harris Group, an international speaking and advising firm dedicated to helping believers in business unleash their unfair advantage in the marketplace. He is the author of Our Unfair Advantage: Unleash the Power of the Holy Spirit in Your Business and numerous other award winning business books.


Slow economic growth is the mantra of political campaigns and economic angst. Growth in economic output per hour (“labour productivity”) achieved an annual pace of 3 percent for a full half-century between 1920 and 1970. Since 1970 that rate has slowed to about 1.5 percent, and in the last six years productivity growth has slowed further to a lamentable 0.5 percent annual rate.

Robin Gordon’s  book The Rise and Fall of American Growth attributes this enormous contrast between rapid growth in 1920-70 and slow growth after 1970 to the basic nature of inventions. Growth in the middle of the 20th century was propelled by the invention in the late 19th century of electricity, the internal combustion engine, the telephone, chemicals and plastics, and the diffusion to every urban household of clear running water and waste removal. America made a transition from 50 percent of the working population on farms to a largely urban nation, and the drudgery of household work – carrying water in and out, doing laundry on a scrub board – made a transition to modern bathrooms and kitchens by the 1950s.

The digital revolution associated with computers has since 1960 dominated the sphere of innovation, as office work transitioned from the typewriter and old-fashioned calculator to the new world of personal computers, spreadsheet and word processing software, the internet, and search engines. But the impact of this revolution in boosting productivity growth lasted only one decade (1995-2005), a much shorter impetus than occurred earlier in the century when productivity growth achieved its 3 percent annual pace for five decades from 1920 to 1970.

Why? The computer revolution altered office work but did not extend into everyday life as had the earlier inventions that brought us electricity, motor vehicles, and the modern kitchen and bathroom. Smart phones were introduced by Blackberry in 2003 and by Apple in 2007, but their uses are primarily to boost consumer enjoyment through social networks and game-playing, not a part of the market economy that creates jobs and pays wages.

Why has productivity growth been so mediocre, a 0.5 percent annual pace since 2010? In my view this has occurred because most of the benefits of the digital revolution were over by 2005. Everywhere you look, from corporate offices to check-in desks at doctor, dentist, and veterinarian offices, the equipment on the desks is the same as in 2005, as is most of the software.

This slackening of the pace of economic growth due to the minor impact of new innovations has both a pessimistic and an optimistic aspect. Slow productivity growth dampens the ability of business firms to provide wage increases to their workers. But slow productivity growth also means that steadily growing output continues to provide new jobs, 15.5 million of which have been created in the U.S. since early 2010.

But how can so many jobs be created in a world of technological hype of robots taking over the economy? Aren’t robots about to decimate jobs, throwing half the population out of work as has been predicted to occur over the next decade by the two Oxford economists in 2013, Carl Frey and Michael Osborne?

Robots are nothing new; the first industrial robot was introduced by General Motors in 1961, and by the mid-1990’s robots had a major role in automobile factories, welding together body parts and freeing human workers from the noxious fumes of the auto paint shop. But robots have made little impact outside of manufacturing. Even Amazon’s high-tech warehouses use robots just to move shelves to human workers, who hand-select the items to be shipped as well as the packing material, and pack the shipments by hand.

But outside of manufacturing and wholesale warehouses, robots are hard to find. I play a game called “find the robot.” In my daily strolls in and out of supermarkets, restaurants, doctor and dentist offices, my nearby hospital, offices in my own university, and the vast amount of employment involving elementary and secondary teachers, personal trainers, and old age caretakers, I have yet to find a robot.

In my journeys, the closest thing I have found to the introduction of a robot in the service sector is that in a local casual dining restaurant, there are kiosks on the tables to allow patrons to pay their bills without human intervention. But offsetting that is the fact that my local supermarket recently removed its self-checkout electronic kiosks to be replaced by human express checkout agents, apparently due to excessive fraud as customers slid expensive items by the dumb credulity of the self-checkout kiosks.

The Frey and Osborne pessimism about jobs is total fiction. They predict over the next decade that 55 percent of airline pilot jobs will be eliminated. Sorry, but government regulations require two pilots in a commercial aircraft, and a switch to one pilot per aircraft is nowhere in sight. They predict that 92 percent of retail checkout clerk jobs will be eliminated, but there is no robot-like replacement of retail clerks in sight beyond the 30-year-old invention of bar-code scanning.

Surely multiple-function robots will be developed, but it will be a long and gradual process before robots outside of manufacturing and wholesaling become a significant factor in replacing human jobs in the service, transportation or construction sectors. And it is in those sectors that the slowness of productivity growth is dragging down the economy’s overall performance.

My book concludes that the rapid economic growth of the mid-20th century cannot be repeated. Those “Great Inventions” were too important and too pervasive to happen again anytime soon.  But let us not forget, the corollary of slow productivity growth is the rapid creation of jobs, as we have witnessed in the last six years and will enjoy for the foreseeable future.

Robert J. Gordon is professor in social sciences at Northwestern University and the author of The Rise and Fall of American Growth, one of six books on the shortlist for the 2016 Financial Times and McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award, to be announced Nov. 22


Alex Cook of Wealth with Purpose and WezHone of Business Greenhouse tackle this important issue in this Christian Wealth video.

It’s high on the enemy’s agenda to break our businesses. The enemy knows how to take this down, and the destructive results (in our lives) when he keeps it down. We need to battle in faith and in prayer. We need to uphold our businesses against the enemy’s work. Take dominion over (full authority) over our businesses.